Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricks

Blogging Insecurities Unveiled….

I wanted to open up to you today about my day to day struggles as a blogger. As an aspiring creative, business women, and graduate student, I do my best to stay and share the positive things in my life. I tend to share the lessons I’ve learned AFTER some time has passed and I’ve reflected, process, and wrote about the experiences. So today I wanted to share something a little bit different. I want to share my biggest insecurities I face on a daily basis as a blogger.

blogging insecurities - blogging advice - how to start a blog - fashion blogger tips

3 Blogging Insecurities I face as a blogger:

Blogging Insecurities #1 Growth

Blogging has been an incredible journey for me that has stayed with me through various stages of my life. From senior year of college, to surviving my first year in the real world, through 3 other job changes, and grad school, blogging has ebb and flowed with the hectic and calm parts of my life.

As I’ve watched bloggers around me take their blogs or Instagrams from 0 to 10,000 or even 20,000 followers in a year, I’ve questioned my own growth. It took me 2 years to refocus, create content, and grow my Instagram account to 14,000 followers. And I’ve worked to grow and connect with my readers/followers organically.

I find myself questioning what I’m doing wrong. Is it my photos? Is it what I write about?  Is the blogging advice or career tips I share not matter? Why am I not growing as quickly as them? These are the questions that race through my head when I question myself on my growth and experience my blogging insecurities in full force.

How I’m overcoming this insecurity:

One way I try to work through my doubts, challenges, and blogging insecurities about growth is to remind myself that everyone is on their own journey. The only race I’m in is the invisible race I place myself in. I have to take a step back and remind myself that my blogging journey is not race and no one is judging me on how fast or slow I grow.

Another way I work through this insecurity is I try to change my mindset. Instead of thinking about my lack or slow growth, I focus on my steady growth. I’ve actually noticed over this past year, my unique sessions and visits on Emma’s Edition is steadily growing. The last 30 days, I drove over 2500 unique sessions and 2000 unique users. That’s the most I’ve ever driven to the blog!

P.S. If you want to see your own stats, you can link your blog to Google Analytics. And remember page views is NOT the same as unique sessions)

If you’re also feeling insecure about your growth, I’m with you. But we can change our mindset and focus on our own journeys! Remember that no one is judging you on how quickly you get to 10,000 or 20,000 followers on Instagram.

Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricksBlogging Insecurity #1 Growth Blogging has been an incredible journey for me that has stayed with me through various stages of my life. From senior year of college, to surviving my first year in the real world, through 3 other job changes, and grad school, blogging has ebb and flowed with the hectic and calm parts of my life. I’ve struggled to grow organically and connect with other readers and friends on Instagram. As I’ve watched bloggers around me take their blogs or Instagrams from 0 to 10,000 or even 20,000 followers in a year, I’ve questioned my own growth. It took me 2 years to refocus, create content, and grow my Instagram account to 14,000 followers. I find myself questioning what I’m doing wrong. Is it my photos? Is it what I write about? Is the blogging advice or career tips I share not matter? Why am I not growing as quickly as them? These are the questions that race through my head when I question myself on my growth. How I work through this insecurity: One way I try to work through my doubts and challenges about growth, is to remind myself that everyone is on their own journey. The only race I’m in is the invisible race I place myself in. I have to take a step back and remind myself that my blogging journey is not race and no one is judging me on how fast or slow I grow. Another way I work through this insecurity is I try to change my mindset. Instead of thinking about my lack or slow growth, I focus on my steady growth. I’ve actually noticed over this past year, my unique sessions and visits on Emma’s Edition is steadily growing. The last 30 days, I drove over 2500 unique sessions and 2000 unique users. That’s the most I’ve ever driven to the blog! P.S. If you want to see your own stats, you can link your blog to Google Analytics. And remember page views is NOT the same as unique sessions) If you’re also feeling insecure about your growth, I’m with you. But we can change our mindset and focus on our own journeys! Remember that no one is judging you on how quickly you get to 10,000 or 20,000 followers on Instagram.

Blogging Insecurities #2: Value

Aside from growth, I really do struggle to consistently see my value as a blogger, micro-influencer, a writer, and a creative. I’m getting better at recognizing that the content I create is valuable but I do have a confession for you today… I didn’t ask or be offered to be paid for a campaign until after I hit 10,000 followers on Instagram.

I didn’t feel confident enough to even ask a brand to see if they had budget to produce their campaigns because I consistently questioned my value as a blogger – especially since there were other girls around me rising to 20K in a matter of months. So when I finally hit over 10K, I turned to the blogging community and started asking about rates and compensation. At the time, I really didn’t get much guidance on where to start charging and I felt pretty discouraged and lost on what was too high to charge or what was to low. So up until last summer, I avoided compensation in the conversations with brands.

I confided in a blogger friend about this and she absolutely couldn’t believe that I didn’t start charging earlier. She told me that I’ve delivered, consistent content throughout my blogging/Instagram journey and that I should have asked way earlier (as early as 5,000 followers).

How I work through this insecurity:

At this point of my blogging career, I’ve worked with a laundry list of brands, developed my writing, and am always working to choose to be positive. Specifically I’ve accepted and acknowledge that I’m driving 2000 different people to Emma’s Edition on a monthly basis. Personally, that is an incredible accomplishment for me.

And even though my Instagram ebbs and flows, but I’m feeling more connected than ever to my readers/followers. If you’re in the same boat and struggle to see your value, you can join me and work through this insecurity by focusing on what you have done well and accomplished for blog or Instagram. I’m telling you right now that you do deliver value to your readers and followers.

Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricksBlogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricks

Blogging Insecurities #3: Engagement

My blogging/Instagram friends can all probably relate… but engagement is one thing I’ve struggled with. As you grow your Instagram following, it becomes more difficult to maintain your engagement. I have periods where I look around and it seems like some bloggers/Instagram influencers aren’t having a problem with their engagement at all. And other times, it seems like everyone is struggling with engagement.

How I’m overcoming this insecurity:

Learning how to let go of the engagement rate is an ongoing process for me. Sometimes I’ll drive 1,000 likes a photo and other times I’ll drive 200 likes… and I have to remember that these swings on engagement are just swings. I have to remind myself to continue to write, brainstorm new content, and engage with you, my readers. I have to remind myself that I would blog without or without Instagram because I truly enjoy relating to the modern woman, talking about fashion, sharing career tips and life lessons.

If you’re also experiencing swinging engagement or even a dip, you aren’t alone. Remember that it isn’t you because Instagram continues to change everyday. I encourage you to focus on delivering quality content and connecting with your readers because at the end of the day the relationships you develop are the real engagements that matters.

Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricks

Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricks

The truth is I know I still have room to grow – in creating even more creative content, in connective with you – my readers, and developing who I am as Emma’s Edition. So I truly I appreciate you for coming along for the ride. For taking the time to click the link on Facebook or LinkedIn, or swipe up on Instagram stories, or even bookmark my page. Thank you so much for stopping by Emma’s Edition or on Instagram and letting me know you’ve taken the time to read my post. It honestly means so much to me! And I know each of us who face these social media/blogging insecurities as a creative or entrepreneur will overcome this together.

What are the things you struggle with as a blogger or creative?

Blogging Insecurities - blogging advice - advice for new bloggers - things i struggle with - blogging challenges - blogging tips and tricks

Thank you for reading! And thank you to Entourage Clothing for the beautiful pleated velvet skirt and off the shoulder top.

Do you want more blogging tips?

Here are some of my favorite instagram/blogging tips posts I’ve shared so far:

10 Everyday Tips to Grow Your Instagram

How I Found the Courage to Start a Blog

 

Love,

Emma

Photos: Karya Schanilec

 

 

How I knew it was time to Leave My First Job - signs its time to leave your job - time to quit your job - when to quit your job

After seven rounds of interviews and a case competition, I landed one of the 13 spots of PepsiCo’s Sales Associate Rotational Program. The program was going to be 4 years long and I would be rotated to different cities with each role. I was going to be placed in Southern California for my first rotation and given a company car. It was my dream to move down to Southern California after graduation and to travel so I knew I had to take the role. Little did I know that I would end up leaving my first job out of college in a year..

My first year in the real world was probably the most challenging life experiences I’ve ever had.

I made every mistake you could probably make in your first job, I cried multiple times, and I was extremely stressed out. So let me tell you how I knew I needed to leave my first job….

My first job as a retail sales rep was very simple: sell and build as many Gatorade and Quaker Oats displays as I could to grocery and store managers. My goal was to always come in as the top salesperson in the territory.

How I knew it was time to Leave My First Job - signs its time to leave your job - time to quit your job - when to quit your job - career advice for millennials

One of the first lessons I learned in my first job was that I did not fit well with the PepsiCo Sales culture.

My business unit ranked the retail sales people and published a monthly/quarterly list. The ranking system was one way the company/leadership motivated its sales teams to sell more and more each year. While some people really enjoyed this type of motivation, I did not. I knew going into the job that I’m motivated to achieve, not motivated to win or beat others. But I wanted to give sales a try because I had majored and marketing and sales in college.

My first 3 months in the job were rough… but after figuring out my selling style and developing relationships with my 31 grocery stories, it did get easier. By the end of my second quarter (6 months), I was ranked 2nd on our scorecard. And by the end of the 1st quarter of 2015 (9 months), I was ranked number one.

Even as my numbers came in, I didn’t feel more fulfilled or motivated by the scorecard – because again, I’m motivated to achieve, not to beat the next person next to me.

How I knew it was time to Leave My First Job - signs its time to leave your job - time to quit your job - when to quit your job

Aside from the company culture, I also learned from this experience that just because I can perform well in job, doesn’t mean I enjoy it or want to do it.

Even though I’m thankful I learned how to build positive relationships with my customers, I also learned that I don’t get a kick out of selling more pallets of food into grocery stores. I realized that in 9 months into the role that I didn’t necessarily enjoy sales either. I decided that I could take relationship building and my emotional intelligence skills into any role I take on.

 

Which leads me to my next reason on why I knew I needed to leave my first job: I couldn’t get excited about the product.

I don’t know about you, but Quaker Oats and Gatorade are both cool brands, but to me they’re still groceries at the end of the day. I was stressed out the entire year about making sure I had enough displays of Chewy Bars, Life Cereal, and Gatorade stands. And I realized I didn’t want an entire career about stressing out about these food products…

I had completed two internships for the Boeing Company where I supported all airplane programs in my Flight Services and Supplier Management internships. I realized that I understand the importance of airplanes in both the commercial and defense industry. Personally, I could see a long term career supporting airplanes more than I did supporting food.

So for me, the culture, the business function (sales), and the product were all signs that helped me decide to leave my first job. Additionally, I knew I wanted to get my master’s degree these next few years. I felt called to go back to Boeing because the Boeing Company pays for you entire master’s degree while PepsiCo didn’t even cover a 1/3 of tuition.

How I knew it was time to Leave My First Job - signs its time to leave your job - time to quit your job - when to quit your job

If you’re debating whether or not your current job is a fit, here are a few signs that show it may be time to leave your current job:

  1. When you wake up unhappy every morning

A big indication of when you know it’s time to move on and leave your first job/or current job is if you wake up unhappy every day. If you aren’t motivated or see the relevance in coming to work, you may not be happy or satisfied with your work situation.

  1. When you are no longer learning or challenged – aka you’re bored.

Whether you’ve been in your role one year or five years, if you feel like you are no longer learning in your role, it’s time to move on. If you find you’re bored or looking for a new challenge, you may need to start looking for a new opportunity to be challenged.

  1. If the company culture is not a good fit

Does your team have a work hard play hard mentality? Does your management team motivate the organization by ranking individuals? Or does your team put in long hours that extend into the weekend?

The way your management motivates employees and the attitude your team has towards work are all a part of the company culture. I’ve found that if the company culture fits my life style, I’m much happier. Personally, I strive for a balance lifestyle. I do work hard at work but it’s also important for me to have time for myself to work out and blog outside of work.

How I knew it was time to Leave My First Job - signs its time to leave your job - time to quit your job - when to quit your job - career advice for millennials

  1. Company goals aren’t aligned with yours

For some people it can be very challenging to work in an industry or support a company whose products, services or goals aren’t in line with yours. For instance, in my experience I couldn’t get excited about selling more Gatorade or Quaker Oats.

You may be able to support a product service or goal that may not be aligned with your goals and values. But you should know that you don’t have to.

  1. You’re burnt out

Working tons of hours, demanding deadlines, and not having time for you at the end of the day or week are all signs that you’re burnt out. If you’re feeling like you can’t unwind or you’re exhausted from work all of the time or unmotivated to get to work each day, you may be burnt out.

Personally in my experience, I was working on average of 50 hours a week. I knew I wanted more work life balanced so I knew I needed to leave my first job.

  1. The work environment is toxic

If you have a struggling relationship with your manager, team, or leadership, or have demanding expectations without the resources or support to succeed, it can be very challenging to strive to be a top performer. You will know if your work environment is toxic. If you’re witnessing people getting thrown underneath the bus during meetings or people living in fear in the office, it may be time to rethink what time of environment you want to work in.

If you recognized that it’s time to leave your job, here are: 10 steps to figure out your next step in your career.

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Thank you for reading!

Love,

Emma

Photos: Holly Phan